Saturday, June 7, 2014

Pittsburgh Vernacular: The "Victorian Cottage"

The concept of micro-housing, or tiny houses, is gaining in popularity. This is not really a new idea, though. In the past, small houses were built for the working class and were very commonplace. However, over the last several decades, small houses were unfortunately thought of as less desirable than large, suburban houses, and many were demolished. 

We can preserve the tiny historic homes in our region and contribute to the micro-housing movement, while also "being green" by re-using existing structures.

These tiny houses represent Pittsburgh vernacular architecture. The one-story Victorian cottage with dormer was once very common on Pittsburgh's North Side and some of the southern hill-top neighborhoods. These homes were often built on the sides of hills. I believe this style of architecture is fairly unique to Pittsburgh.




Victorian cottage with dormer in East Deutschtown (North Side)

East Deutschtown

841 Suismon (now demolished) - an example of a Victorian cottage with mansard roof.

An example of a Victorian cottage built into the side of a hill on Walz Street (now demolished).

Victorian cottage with dormer, built on the side of a hill on Walz Street (now demolished).

Victorian cottages on Voskamp Street. Only the center cottage survives.

An example of a brick Victorian cottage in East Deutschtown.

A tiny house in Hays

Spring Garden

Spring Garden

Spring Garden

The center door is unique. Spring Garden.

Spring Garden

Spring Garden

Spring Garden

No comments:

Post a Comment