Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Carnegie, PA

An old town with a rich architectural legacy, Carnegie was originally two boroughs. Mansfield and Chartiers were separated by Chartiers Creek.  Both appear to be densely built up on the 1886 GM Hopkins map.  In 1894, the two boroughs became Carnegie, named after Andrew Carnegie, who donated a library to the town. The stately library is restored and sits up on the hill overlooking the town. Carnegie has a nice collection of 19th century homes and churches.  It is also home to an active historical society, which has a museum featuring an extremely detailed miniature model of the town as it looked in the 1940s.

Near the intersection of Campbell's Run and Church St. "1872"

Campbells Run and Church St. "1872"

Campbell's Run and Church St. "1872"
Campbell's Run and Church St.  "1872"


This looks extremely old.

Check out that stone. How old might this be?  The Historical Society of Carnegie did not know.

Downtown Carnegie




Chartiers Creek

Up on the hill overlooking the town is the Carnegie Library of Carnegie (and Music Hall).

10 comments:

  1. I wanted to let you know that the house that you say looks extremely old, was in fact apart of the Underground Railroad. It is now a business.

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  2. I lived in that house back in the late 1950's. That house was so scarey.

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    Replies
    1. WAS IT REALLY SPOOKY OR WAS IT JUST YOUR IMAGINATION RUNNING AWAY WITH YOU?

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    2. I lived there and was not our imagination,did not know anything about that house, when we lived there. Lived there for 2 months and moved out. Never seen or heard anything .There use to be green veins that were up the side of that house. Didn't say it was spooket just scarey.

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  3. AnonymousMay 18, 2014

    I remember the Illynkoffs (not sure if that was the correct spelling) lived in that home. The underground railroad Ran from there all the way down Broadway ext to St Mary church I believe. My grandmother lived on that street and told us many stories. I also remember a Episcopal Chruch in the front on Washington ave

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  4. The church you show is supposedly being used for storage, along with the adjacent wood structure. My grandmother-in-law sought to buy it a few years ago to restore and repurpose it, possibly for a space to rent for dance classes, after school activities for Carlynton, etc.

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  5. used to live in Bridgeville and haven't been to Carnegie in years....it's looking wonderful

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  6. Was looking up the underground railroad in Carnegie. Found books on google that were written by two professors at Duquesne Univ. Pgh.Thomas Hughes house in Greene County, PA was built in 1814., built of hand cut stone. Looks like this house in Carnegie. I wonder if this could be the Mansfield B Brown house, If so could have been built around the same time.

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  7. Where was (or is) N. Stanley Street located in Carnegie. I was researching family history and my great grandparents were listed as living on N. Stanley St. I am unable to find it on a map. Thanks

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  8. I posted a few minutes ago with a question about N. Stanley St in Carnegie. I forgot to check the box with my email address. steelerdude57@gmail.com I was wondering if this street still exist.

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